AN AMERICAN MASTER

JOHN PHILLIP OSBORNE: THE THIRTEEN COLONIES

May 12-13 & 19-20, 2018

Jacobus Vanderveer House & Museum, Bedminster, New Jersey

Jacobus Vanderveer House & Museum

River Road Park, 3055 River Road

Bedminster, New Jersey 07921

Phone: (908) 396-6053

THE THIRTEEN COLONIES COLLECTION

SOLD | Massachusetts
SOLD | Massachusetts

"Boston Tea Party" Oil on panel, 7" x 12" December 16, 1773 - During the night, American patriots disguised as Mohawk Indians threw 342 chests of tea belonging to the British East India Company overboard into the Boston Harbor. This protest was in opposition to various Townshend Acts and taxation without representation.

SOLD | Pennsylvania
SOLD | Pennsylvania

"Constitution Debate" Oil on panel, 8" x 10" May 25 - September 17, 1787 - Washington was unanimously elected presiding officer of the Constitutional Convention, which met in the Pennsylvania State House in Philadelphia. He was the one most trusted by the delegates, which included many leading figures of the period, who were debating bitterly while drawing up the document. Under Washington’s guidance, 39 delegates signed the Constitution on September 17, 1787.

SOLD | North Carolina
SOLD | North Carolina

"Cowpens" Oil on panel, 8" x 12" Jan. 17, 1781- After several defeats, the American army verged on total collapse. British dragoons under Sir Banastre Tarleton had pushed Gen. Daniel Morgan to the open fields of the Cowpens (an area well-known as cattle pastureland). Here, Morgan made a stand. Taking an overconfident Tarleton by surprise, he commanded a counterattack. With staggering British losses, the Battle of Cowpens was a brilliant Patriot victory and turned the tide of the war.

SOLD | New Jersey
SOLD | New Jersey

"Heat of the Battle, Monmouth" Oil on panel, 8" x 12" June 28, 1778 - After American Gen. Charles Lee tried to retreat, a furious Washington rode through the ranks, rallying and inspiring his men amidst the swirling confusion near Monmouth Courthouse. They fought to a standstill in the open fields in the sweltering 100°F heat (so oppressive it killed Washington’s own horse). The Battle of Monmouth was the longest and final large engagement in the North.

Delaware
Delaware

"Lafayette, Battle of Brandywine" Oil on panel, 12" x 8" Sept. 11, 1777 - Under Gen. Howe, British forces launched a surprise bombardment on the Revolutionary Army. In a hasty attempt to counter, the American’s improvised line of defense wavered. Lafayette rallied the men in a desperate fight, until he was shot in the leg and led the retreat. In the end, British troops took the battlefield but they had not destroyed Washington’s army.

Rhode Island
Rhode Island

"Newport" Oil on linen panel, 8" x 12" The red building on Marlborough St., opened in 1673, is still the White Horse Tavern today and was a meeting place for the Colony’s General Assembly. Serving in the Battle of Rhode Island in 1778, John Glover and his Marbleheaders became known as the “Amphibious Regiment” for their vital nautical skills. They played a crucial role in the war, ferrying Washington and his 2,400 men across the Delaware River in a blinding snowstorm in 1776.

SOLD  |  Connecticut
SOLD | Connecticut

"Rochambeau & Washington Planning Yorktown" Oil on panel, 8" x 10" May 1781 - This famous council of war took place between Washington and Rochambeau at the Joseph Webb House in Wethersfield, CT. Washington spent five days with the French General planning the joint military campaign and mapping the route to what would become the final stance - the capture of the British forces under Charles Cornwallis in the Siege of Yorktown and the victorious end to the American Revolution.

SOLD | Maryland
SOLD | Maryland

"Sea Battle, Chesapeake Bay" Oil on panel, 7" x 12" Sept. 5, 1781 - French Admiral De Grasse outfought the combined fleets of British Admirals Hood and Graves in the Battle of the Chesapeake Capes, forcing them back to New York and gaining control of the Bay. This success was crucial to Washington’s daring victory at Yorktown and achieving American independence - preventing Cornwallis from receiving reinforcements and helping ensure Washington could use the Bay to transport troops and supplies.

New Hampshire
New Hampshire

"Shipbuilding, Portsmouth" Oil on panel, 8" x 12" The many tidal coves in Portsmouth were conducive for shipbuilding. Here, Ranger was constructed for Captain John Paul Jones to fight the British in 1777. It was also here that Jones’ America was outfitted, the largest warship built in the nation at that time. The house Jones spent many happy hours in still stands, as does the Wentworth-Gardner House, a powerful family dynasty in colonial New Hampshire.

SOLD | South Carolina
SOLD | South Carolina

"Siege of Charleston" Oil on panel, 8" x 12" Mar. 29-May 12, 1780 - British northern strategy collapsed and they focused on the Southern Colonies, forcing the American militia to set out to defend Charleston. The steeple of St. Michael’s Church sheltered Patriot lookouts during the six-week siege. The town fell to the British upon the surrender of Gen. Lincoln on May 12. The British burned almost the entire town, and this major engagement stands as one of the worst American defeats of the war.

SOLD | Georgia
SOLD | Georgia

"Swamp Fox" Oil on panel, 8" x 12" Francis Marion was called “Swamp Fox” for his cunning and resourcefulness. Marion used the landscape to his advantage, outwitting the British by mounting devastating surprise ambushes and then withdrawing to the Southern swamps and forests. In November 1780, Sir Banastre Tarleton was sent to capture Marion. After a seven-hour chase, 26 miles, oppressive heat, and mosquitoes, Swamp Fox eluded capture and helped keep American independence alive in the South.

SOLD | New York
SOLD | New York

"The First President" Oil on panel, 8" x 12" April 30, 1789 - Before a crowd of thousands, George Washington was sworn in as the first American president at Federal Hall in New York City, overlooking Wall and Broad Streets. Dressed in a plain brown broadcloth suit, holding a ceremonial army sword, the impressive and solemn 6’3” figure took the oath of office and delivered the first inaugural address – taking political helm of the new country.

SOLD  |  Virginia
SOLD | Virginia

"Williamsburg" Oil on panel, 9" x 12" From 1699-1780, Williamsburg was the capital of the royal British colony of Virginia. After May 1776, it was the capital of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia. A training ground for leaders of the cause, Virginians meeting here on May 15, 1776 became the first to propose freedom for all 13 colonies. The Declaration of Independence was adopted less than two months later. The painting depicts a typical bustling day on the Duke of Gloucester St.

FURTHER WORKS:

REVOLUTIONARY, LANDSCAPE, STILL LIFE, & PORTRAIT

SOLD "Clams and Mussels"
SOLD "Clams and Mussels"

Oil on linen, 18" x 24"

"Evesham, Cotswolds"
"Evesham, Cotswolds"

Sepia chalk, 14.5" x 21.5"

"The Bust of Benjamin Franklin"
"The Bust of Benjamin Franklin"

Pencil & Charcoal, 22" x 15" This was the first bust created by French sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon in what would be a series of American portraits, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Paul Jones, and Lafayette. Houdon created two busts of Franklin, this one in 1778. That year, after negotiating the Treaty of Alliance with the court of King Louis XVI, Franklin became the first official diplomat and ambassador to the 13 colonies when he was elected minister to France.

SOLD "Home, After the War"
SOLD "Home, After the War"

Oil on panel, 20" x 18" After seven years of war, a drummer boy returns home to his family with stories of heroic deeds by enlightened men - and the beginning of a new era.

"The Bust of George Washington"
"The Bust of George Washington"

Pencil & Charcoal, 22" x 15" Jean-Antoine Houdon sailed for Mount Vernon in 1785 to do a commissioned bust of Washington. After weeks of struggling, Houdon saw the moment he had been waiting for when Washington became indignant about a horse trader’s prices - chin raised, head slightly tilted, firm jaw. This bust of Washington is regarded as one of the most accurate representations of his face in existence - the expression of pride and strength that inspired a nation.

"Moonlight"
"Moonlight"

Oil on linen, 36" x 48"

"Sewing Table, 1805"
"Sewing Table, 1805"

Oil on linen, 24" x 20"

SOLD "Spring Mountain Laurel"
SOLD "Spring Mountain Laurel"

Oil on linen, 40" x 50"

"The Coast of Newport"
"The Coast of Newport"

Oil on linen, 18" x 24"

SOLD
SOLD

"The March through the Watchung Mountains" Oil on canvas, 22" x 28" The Watchung Mountains, known to Washington as the Blue Hills, were a natural barrier behind which the Continental Army was safe from attacks by the British out of New York City. Washington sheltered in these hills with various regiments during three winter encampments - two in the wilderness of Jockey Hollow about four miles from Morristown, and one at Middlebrook.

"The Epic Heroism of Jockey Hollow"
"The Epic Heroism of Jockey Hollow"

Oil on canvas, 30" x 50" Dec. 1779 - Blizzards welcomed Washington’s army to Morristown during the worst winter of the 18th c. No man could endure the storms’ violence many minutes without risking his life, and yet for two months these underfed and poorly clothed troops cleared 600 acres and constructed 1000+ logs huts. This painting honors what the Continental Army and its Commander endured during these terrible months – and the fortitude of the human spirit it took to survive.

"Valley Light"
"Valley Light"

Oil on linen, 18" x 24"

"Washington, Lafayette, & the Army"
"Washington, Lafayette, & the Army"

Jockey Hollow Oil on linen, 30" x 40" Each brigade at Jockey Hollow occupied huts arranged eight to a row, three to four rows deep. It was a log house city - the sixth largest city in the colonies! Lafayette arrived in Morristown in 1780 with news that the French would be sending an expeditionary force of about 6,000 men lead by the Comte de Rochambeau. Hearing the news, Washington’s “eyes filled with tears of joy.”

"Washington's Farewell"
"Washington's Farewell"

Fraunces Tavern Oil on panel, 18" x 14" December 4, 1783 - Just nine days after the final British soldiers left American soil, George Washington invited his officers to the Fraunces Tavern in New York City to bid farewell. After leading the army through seven long years of war, he planned to resume civilian life. “Suffused in tears,” Washington embraced his officers, sailed for Annapolis to resign his commission, and then returned to his beloved Mount Vernon in time for Christmas.

"Portrait of the Artist"
"Portrait of the Artist"

Oil on linen, 30" x 25"

"Snowshill"
"Snowshill"

Oil on linen, 30" x 40"

"Moonlight Reflections"
"Moonlight Reflections"

Oil on linen panel, 14" x 18"

"Prelude - Battle of Monmouth"
"Prelude - Battle of Monmouth"

Oil on linen panel, 9" x 18"

"Sulgrave Manor"
"Sulgrave Manor"

George Washington's ancestral home. Oil on linen, 16" x 20"

"Ink Set, 1776"
"Ink Set, 1776"

Oil on linen, 14" x 18"

"1776"
"1776"

Pen and ink, 9" x 6"

"Franklin and King Louis XVI"
"Franklin and King Louis XVI"

The French Alliance Oil on linen, 25" x 30"

"Chinese Export & Hydrangea"
"Chinese Export & Hydrangea"

Oil on linen, 22" x 28"

"Through the Jerseys"
"Through the Jerseys"

Oil on linen, 16" x 20"

"Lower Slaughter, Cotswolds"
"Lower Slaughter, Cotswolds"

Pen and ink, 7" x 11"

"Through the Cotswolds"
"Through the Cotswolds"

Pen and ink, 7" x 11"

SOLD
SOLD

"John Adams in the Court of King Louis XVI" Oil on linen, 18" x 20"

"Royal Crown Derby"
"Royal Crown Derby"

Oil on linen panel, 18" x 20"

"Lovers Bridge, Bruges"
"Lovers Bridge, Bruges"

Pen and ink, 7" x 11"

"Cannons at Monmouth"
"Cannons at Monmouth"

Oil on linen, 24" x 30"

"Tavern Debates, 1776"
"Tavern Debates, 1776"

Oil on linen panel, 16" x 18"

"The March to Morristown"
"The March to Morristown"

Oil on linen panel, 36" x 48"

SOLD "New Jersey Winter, 1779"
SOLD "New Jersey Winter, 1779"

Oil on linen panel, 10" x 15"

"Forsythia and Tulips"
"Forsythia and Tulips"

Oil on linen, 22" x 18"

"Spring Orchard"
"Spring Orchard"

Oil on linen, 22" x 26"

"Into the Orchard"
"Into the Orchard"

Oil on linen, 20" x 16"

"Wooden Village of Jockey Hollow"
"Wooden Village of Jockey Hollow"

Sepia & white chalk, 10" x 14"

"Self Portrait"
"Self Portrait"

Pencil and brush, 9" x 6"

"Fraunces Tavern"
"Fraunces Tavern"

Pen and ink, 9" x 6"