JOHN PHILLIP OSBORNE

REVOLUTIONARY WORKS

"After the March, 1779"
"After the March, 1779"

Washington & Lafayette Oil on canvas, 30" x 40"

"Morristown, 1779-80"
"Morristown, 1779-80"

Oil on canvas, 36" x 48"

"Patriotic Fury"
"Patriotic Fury"

The Battle of Monmouth Oil on canvas, 20" x 30"

"The World Turned Upside Down"
"The World Turned Upside Down"

Oil on panel, 20" x 14"

SOLD "Prelude - Battle of Trenton, 1776"
SOLD "Prelude - Battle of Trenton, 1776"

Oil on linen, 30" x 28"

"Lafayette, Battle of Brandywine"
"Lafayette, Battle of Brandywine"

Delaware Oil on panel, 12" x 8" Sept. 11, 1777 - Under Gen. Howe, British forces launched a surprise bombardment on the Revolutionary Army. In a hasty attempt to counter, the American’s improvised line of defense wavered. Lafayette rallied the men in a desperate fight, until he was shot in the leg and led the retreat. So fierce was the fighting that Philadelphians could hear guns 25 miles away. In the end, British troops took the battlefield but they had not destroyed Washington’s army.

"Newport"
"Newport"

Rhode Island Oil on linen panel, 8" x 12" The red building on Marlborough St., opened in 1673, is still the White Horse Tavern today and was a meeting place for the Colony’s General Assembly. Serving in the Battle of Rhode Island in 1778, John Glover and his Marbleheaders became known as the “Amphibious Regiment” for their vital nautical skills. They played a crucial role in the war, ferrying Washington and his 2,400 men across the Delaware River in a blinding snowstorm in 1776.

"Shipbuilding, Portsmouth"
"Shipbuilding, Portsmouth"

New Hampshire Oil on panel, 8" x 12" The many tidal coves in Portsmouth were conducive for shipbuilding. Here, Ranger was constructed for Captain John Paul Jones to fight the British in 1777. It was also here that Jones’ America was outfitted, the largest warship built in the nation at that time. The house Jones spent many happy hours in still stands, as does the Wentworth-Gardner House, a powerful family dynasty in colonial New Hampshire.

"The Bust of Benjamin Franklin"
"The Bust of Benjamin Franklin"

Pencil & Charcoal, 22" x 15" This was the first bust created by French sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon in what would be a series of American portraits, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Paul Jones, and Lafayette. Houdon created two busts of Franklin, this one in 1778. That year, after negotiating the Treaty of Alliance with the court of King Louis XVI, Franklin became the first official diplomat and ambassador to the 13 colonies when he was elected minister to France.

"The Bust of George Washington"
"The Bust of George Washington"

Pencil & Charcoal, 22" x 15" Jean-Antoine Houdon sailed for Mount Vernon in 1785 to do a commissioned bust of Washington. After weeks of struggling, Houdon saw the moment he had been waiting for when Washington became indignant about a horse trader’s prices - chin raised, head slightly tilted, firm jaw. This bust of Washington is regarded as one of the most accurate representations of his face in existence - the expression of pride and strength that inspired a nation.

"The Epic Heroism of Jockey Hollow"
"The Epic Heroism of Jockey Hollow"

Oil on canvas, 30" x 50" Dec. 1779 - Blizzards welcomed Washington’s army to Morristown during the worst winter of the 18th c. No man could endure the storms’ violence many minutes without risking his life, and yet for two months these underfed and poorly clothed troops cleared 600 acres and constructed 1000+ logs huts. This painting honors what the Continental Army and its Commander endured during these terrible months – and the fortitude of the human spirit it took to survive.

"Washington, Lafayette, & the Army"
"Washington, Lafayette, & the Army"

Jockey Hollow Oil on linen, 30" x 40" Each brigade at Jockey Hollow occupied huts arranged eight to a row, three to four rows deep. It was a log house city - the sixth largest city in the colonies! Lafayette arrived in Morristown in 1780 with news that the French would be sending an expeditionary force of about 6,000 men lead by the Comte de Rochambeau. Hearing the news, Washington’s “eyes filled with tears of joy.”

"1776"
"1776"

Pen and ink, 9" x 6"

"Washington"
"Washington"

Drawn from life from the bust by sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon Pencil, 14" x 10"

"Cannons at Monmouth"
"Cannons at Monmouth"

Oil on linen, 24" x 30"

"Tavern Debates, 1776"
"Tavern Debates, 1776"

Oil on linen panel, 16" x 18"

"The March to Morristown"
"The March to Morristown"

Oil on linen panel, 36" x 48"

"Wooden Village of Jockey Hollow"
"Wooden Village of Jockey Hollow"

Sepia & white chalk, 10" x 14"

"The General & His Troops"
"The General & His Troops"

Oil on linen, 60" x 50"

"The Twenty-Eighth Storm"
"The Twenty-Eighth Storm"

Jockey Hollow Oil on linen, 50" x 40"

"Prelude - Battle of Monmouth"
"Prelude - Battle of Monmouth"

Oil on linen panel, 9" x 18"

"Sulgrave Manor"
"Sulgrave Manor"

George Washington's ancestral home. Oil on linen, 16" x 20"

SOLD "Ink Set, 1776"
SOLD "Ink Set, 1776"

Oil on linen, 14" x 18"

"Courage in Jockey Hollow"
"Courage in Jockey Hollow"

Oil on linen, 36" x 24"

"Franklin and King Louis XVI"
"Franklin and King Louis XVI"

The French Alliance Oil on linen, 25" x 30"

"Through the Jerseys"
"Through the Jerseys"

Oil on linen, 16" x 20"

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY

American, graduated cum laude from Pratt Institute in New York and studied painting with Alban Albert and Arthur Maynard who in turn were from the influence of Frank Vincent DuMond.

"Coming into my thirty-eighth year of painting and teaching, my point of view has not wavered and that is to recreate life on canvas. In doing so, there is a life long study of the infinite effects of light that nature has to offer. The light is always prismatic, no matter what time of day or weather condition. There is always just one light source, whether painting outdoors or indoors in a North-lit studio. I arrange the colors on my palette prismatically and strive to get the prism under control with the subtle atmospheric progression of colors and values. 

Studying the masters, such as George Inness, John Constable, and the French Barbizon painters, I have been able to see what they have shared in common. Now when I go out and paint, I can see beyond the obvious. I am less interested in the fine details and look instead to convey the mood and overall feeling of the moment."